Multiplication and Arrays

In Maths we have been focussing on times tables and the multiplication process.

Multiplication is a very important part of maths, and having a good “automatic recall” of times tables helps us with many different areas of maths.

During class time we have been spending time practising different times tables and using multiplication in our problem solving.

Here are two fun multiplication websites you might enjoy using to practise your skills.

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We have also been working with arrays to help build our mathematical skills. An array is a set of objects arranged in rows and columns. Each row has the same number of objects, so they represent equal groups.  Arrays can make counting and calculating easier. Thanks to Mr Salsich for this array diagram.

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Arrays are useful for skip counting and solving multiplication problems.

The array above has 3 rows of 4 blocks. That is 3 groups of 4, or 3 x 4.

We can find out how many blocks there are by skip counting by 4’s:  4, 8, 12 – or by doing repeated addition: 4 + 4 + 4 = 12.

There are 12 blocks. So, 3 x 4 = 12.

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In 4KJ, we have been building our skills to work with bigger arrays. We have been using the two arrays below in our maths lessons this week. The students had to use their mathematical knowledge to calculate how many dots were in the arrays. It was very interesting to see the many different strategies students used during this task.

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Challenge: What strategies would you use to work out how many dots are in this array? We’d love to hear from family members too!

(Tip – click on the array to see an enlarged image).

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What times tables are you confident with?

Which times tables would you like to improve at?

When do you use multiplication in real life?

Where have you seen arrays in everyday life?

Multiplication and Division Fact Families

At the end of last term, the students in 4KM and 4KJ were learning about multiplication and practising their times tables.

We have started this term by exploring the relationship between multiplication and division. These are called inverse operations – that means they undo each other.

We have been making fact families with multiplication and division.

Click on the link below to watch this video to learn about fact families. Tip: right click and chose “open in new tab” so you can come back to the blog when you’ve finished watching.

Today all the students made a poster of a fact family to demonstrate their learning.

What do you think of our posters?

Why are fact families useful to know about?

Can you make up a fact family or ask us a multiplication or division problem?