Understanding Apostrophes

In 4KM and 4KJ we have been learning about apostrophes.

An apostrophe is a type of punctuation.

apostrophe

On a keyboard, you can usually find an apostrophe to the left of enter.

keyboard apostrophe

Apostrophes can be confusing. Here are some tips that might help.

Unfortunately, there are many people who don’t know how to use apostrophes correctly. In an effort to teach the community about correct apostrophe use, 4KM and 4KJ students created some posters using Kerpoof. They chose one of the apostrophe rules to demonstrate in their poster.

Check out our work…

Tip: click on the full screen button for a clearer view.

Did our tips help you learn about apostrophes?

Can you make up a sentence to demonstrate your understanding of one of the apostrophe rules?

Me, Myself and I: How to Use These Words Correctly

4KM and 4KJ have been learning about a grammatical error that is very common; the two personal pronouns me and I are often used incorrectly. This is a mistake that can be made by people of all ages.

There are times when the word me is needed in a sentence and other times when the word I is needed. For some reason (maybe because they think it sounds babyish), some people are nervous about using the word me so they use the word I instead.

How do you know whether to use me or I?

Generally, the word I goes before the verb (doing word).

Examples:

I went to a party.

She and I went to a party.

Jane, Mike and I went to a party.

***

Generally, the word me goes after the verb.

Examples:

He made some lunch for me.

He made some lunch for Fred and me.

He made some lunch for the teachers, Fred and me.

***

Still not sure?

Take the other nouns of the sentence and try both I and me. See what would make sense.

Example:

Would it be “She took a photo of Sally and me” or “She took a photo of Sally and I”?

She took a photo of I (NO)

She took a photo of me (YES)

She took a photo of Sally and me (YES)

In an effort to teach the community about how to correctly use me and I, 4KM and 4KJ made posters with examples. 

Thank you to Emily and Becky for taking the photos.

What about myself? When should you use that word?

Sometimes people use the word myself when they really mean I or me.

Example:

Please talk to Mrs Hill or myself if you have any questions (NO)

Please talk to me if you have any questions (YES)

Please talk to Mrs Hill or me if you have any questions (YES)

Myself is a reflexive pronoun. That means it expresses something you do to yourself. Sentences that contain the word myself also contain the word I.

The word myself is not supposed to be a commonly used word. It should not be used instead of I or me.

Examples:

I taught myself how to play the piano.

I thought to myself, “I should be more careful!”

I hurt myself when I fell off the monkey bars.

The word myself can also sometimes be used to emphasise the fact that you did something (not someone else). In this case, myself is an intensive pronoun.

Examples:

I did the whole project myself (ie. no one helped you).

I myself cleaned the whole classroom (ie. you did this task alone).

 

Can you leave a comment demonstrating how to use me, myself and I?

Have you seen or heard me, myself or I used incorrectly? What was the mistake?

Apostrophes

In 4KM and 4KJ we are focussing on apostrophes.

An apostrophe is a type of punctuation.

apostrophe

On a keyboard, you can usually find an apostrophe to the left of enter.

keyboard apostrophe

Apostrophes can be confusing. Here are some tips that might help.

Unfortunately, there are many people who don’t know about how to use apostrophes correctly. A lot of people think that any word that ends with an s needs an apostrophe. Remember, plurals do not need an apostrophe.

What is wrong with this picture?

Image: ‘Sofia’s Pizza’s Calzoni’s Kebab’s Burger’s Pakora’s’
http://www.flickr.com/photos/34427470616@N01/2392092122
Found on flickrcc.net

Did our tips help you learn about apostrophes?

What is wrong with the picture? Have you seen any businesses use apostrophes incorrectly before?

Can you make up a sentence that has an apostrophe before an s, after an s and in a contraction?